Middle-Aged Heroines: Locating Ageing Women in Victorian Fiction

By Sarah Ross   “Old age” was as ambiguous a term for the Victorians as it is for us. Where should one draw the line: between 40.9 and 46, the midway points for average life spans from 1838 to 1900?[1] 50, that modern magic “mid-life crisis” mark? 65, the eventual date of forced retirement and…

Mary Jane Watson and her Amazing Friends: Marvel Movies, Heroic Women and Postfeminist Culture

By Miriam Kent   Feminism and superhero movies have been a hot topic for the last few years, with both fans and cultural commentators drawing attention to the lack of heroic women in a genre which is by now a staple of the blockbuster seasons. Since the beginning of the superhero boom in the early…

Attachment parenting: A rather Feminist upbringing?

By Jennah Evans Attachment Parenting (AP) is a method of nurturing and socialising children which has often attracted the scrutiny and scorn of the Feminist lens. After all, what could possibly be empowering about fostering a state of complete co-dependence between a parent and child?   It has to be considered that, overwhelmingly it is still…

Sex-differences and ‘domestic violence murders’*

By Karen Ingala Smith *intimate partner homicides  What could we do if we wanted to hide the reality of men’s violence against women? Firstly, we might have  a ‘gender neutral’ definition of domestic violence.  Maybe like the UK government which uses the following definition: “any incident or pattern of incidents of controlling, coercive, threatening behaviour, violence or abuse between…

The Importance of Female Queer Representation on Television

By Esther Nassaris       Finding any queer women on television was once like searching for a needle in a haystack: difficult, annoying, and rarely worth it. Even if you did get lucky, chances are the writing would have been terrible and the representation would be ripe with negative stereotypes. Luckily things are changing…

It’s A Man’s World: The Implications of Makeup in Mass Effect

By Dawna Perry     “Human sperm cells were seen with the earliest microscopes in the seventeenth century. The human egg is several thousand times larger, but — despite earlier postulates — it was not visualized until 1827. […] For something to be found, it must first be imagined and sought.” (Duffin, Jacalyn. A History of…

Women in academia… it’s really all about how you dress

By Rachel Handforth   This week has seen a particularly depressing image circulating on my Facebook news feed. For those of you fortunate enough to have missed it, here it is. As well as finding it offensive because of its blatant objectification, I find it personally incredibly disheartening. There’s so much written about women in the media…