Review of The Politics of Everybody: Feminism, Queer Theory, and Marxism at the Intersection – Holly Lewis

As the title suggests, Holly Lewis' The Politics of Everybody falls squarely within an interdisciplinary move. Contrarily though, her book eschews that politics of intersectionality which is centred on the model of individuals criss-crossed by different oppressions. Instead, she bridges the distance between Marxism, Feminism and Queer theory to expand on the politics of a…

Review of ‘Mobilizing Transnational Gender Politics in Post-Genocide Rwanda’

Mobilizing Transnational Gender Politics in Post-Genocide Rwanda, by Rirhandu Mageza-Barthel Review by Saide Mobayed The image on the cover of Mobilizing Transnational Gender Politics in Post-genocide Rwanda depicts a cubist style grey woman carrying over her head what can be interpreted as a coffin with four skulls: the burden of being genocide victims. They represent hate,…

Review of ‘Corporeality and Culture: Bodies in Movement’

Corporeality and Culture: Bodies in Movement, edited by Karin Sellberg, Lena WĂĄnggren and Kamillea Aghtan Review by Veronika Schuchter For Rosi Braidotti the “cartography is not the moment of movement [but] the moment of stillness” and functions as a navigational as well as dialogical tool and, most importantly, cartographies need to be exchanged.[1] This edited collection…

Review of ‘Mobility in the Victorian Novel: Placing the Nation’

Mobility in the Victorian Novel: Placing the Nation by Charlotte Mathieson Review by Lena WĂĄnggren For those of us who enjoyed Charlotte Mathieson’s chapter in the recent collection Transport in British Fiction: Technologies of Movement, 1840-1940 (2015, ed. Adrienne Gavin & Andrew Humphries), her full-length monograph Mobility in the Victorian Novel: Placing the Nation comes as…

Review of ‘Women Workers and the Trade Unions: New Revised Edition’

Women Workers and the Trade Unions: New Revised Edition By Sarah Boston   This updated edition of Sarah Boston’s classic study of British trade unionism offers a detailed account of cis women’s role in labour history. Divided into fourteen chronologically organized chapters, taking us from 1874 through to 2010, it manages to cover a huge…

Review of ‘Fat Sex: New Directions in Theory and Activism’

      Fat Sex: New Directions in Theory and Activism Edited by Helen Hester, Middlesex University, UK and Caroline Walters, BiUK. Ashgate. The editors of "Fat Sex: New Directions in Theory and Activism" set out with several laudable aims in mind. They are looking to address the gap in fat studies around theorizing fat sex.…

The politics of Skin Bleaching in South Africa

By Ayanda Tshabalala   This blog post is based on a conference paper which was presented at FWSA ( Feminist and Woman's Studies Association) Biennial Conference 2015 – 9 Sept 2015 and based on my Masters dissertation at UKZN (University of KwaZulu-Natal). The FWSA Conference offered great exposure to global thought and helped set the tone…

Review of China’s Leftover Women reviewed by Wilma Garvin

To, S. (2015) China’s Leftover Women. London: Routledge.     Sandy To is a lecturer in the Department of Sociology at the University of Hong Kong. She did her PhD at Cambridge where she did her PhD research on Chinese professional women’s views on marriage and partner choices.  The chapters of the book are based…

Book Review: Stitching the World. Embroidered Maps and Women’s Geographical Education by Judith A. Tyner

Judith A. Tyner, Stitching the World. Embroidered Maps and Women’s Geographical Education, Surrey, England: Ashgate Studies in Historical Geography, 2015. 142 pages, ISBN 978-1-4094-2635-6   Reviewed by Chiara Bernardi. Chiara holds a PhD from the Centre of Interdisciplinary Methodologies at the University of Warwick. She s currently undertaking her post-doctoral research and working as a master…